Attract New Customers from Google with this 30-day challenge any Small Business can Accomplish

in Blog, Content Marketing, Search Engine Optimization, Small Business Marketing, Storytelling This article was originally published by Julian Seery Gude on The Remarkable Blog from exceler8.com
NaBloWriMo 2013 for Small Business

Small Business Challenge: Get more visitors from Google for your business without a single advertising dollar by writing a blog post every.

Attract New Customers from Google with this 30-day challenge any small business can accomplish:

I’m kicking off a challenge today to small business owners and personnel to write every day in November with the goal of producing at least 15 useful blog posts that you post on your website between November 1 – 30th,  2013. I’ll be playing along with you.

More readers. More prospective customers.

  1. You’re an expert in your business. People want to know what you know. The no bullshit version. Give it to them.
  2. Publishing authoritative, useful articles that your prospective customers value will increase your search engine rankings on Google and drive more people to your website. Tailor those articles to your ideal customer and the visits you receive from Google are more likely to turn into sales leads.
  3. People are looking for honest answers to questions so simple your kid could answer them. Like, how much it’ll cost them to hire a company like yours or buy your product. My average small business website re-design project is $3,000. Why are some people in my field charging $300 and some charging $30,000? Wouldn’t it be nice to know exactly why so you can hire the right firm? Go ahead, try and find pricing on a web designer’s flashy website. You won’t find many. Your competitors aren’t answering these questions. Neither are you. Yet. You’re going to fix that.
  4. To do this you need to establish a new habit. Psychologists say it takes two weeks to form a new habit. A month makes for some good habit building and practice. It’s a great way to get started.

Any Small Business Can Do This if you’re Willing to Do The Work.

I’ve never met a harder working group of people than small business owners or freelancers. As a class, we’re workaholics. We’ve got this sweat equity thing down cold! With apologies to Yogi Berra, blogging is ninety percent perspiration, the other half is reading about writing. If you’re reading this, you’re already halfway home.

It’s well established that you don’t need to be a ‘writer’ to have a successful business blog that generates sales leads. You write like you talk when you speak to someone who calls or visits your business. And the talking (er, writing) you’ll be doing is answering questions. You’re already good at that. Every customer who calls asks you about the same things.

  • How will this/you help me?
  • How much does it cost?
  • What, where,  How can I buy this from you?
  • Why should I buy it from you instead of Dick or Jane?

Every question is some derivative of these questions. Every piece of advertising or marketing you’ve ever seen is about answering these questions.

But why the stupid name? #NaBloWriMo – National Blog Writing Month

NaNoWriMo is the original inspiration. That’s National Novel Writing Month, the writing challenge that twenty-one San Francisco based writers first organized in 1999 as a way to spur each other to write a 50,000 word novel in only 30 days. The program was an instant hit with professional writers and amateurs alike and today marks the beginning of the 15th event. There are 238,732 novelists and wannabe writers signed up to compete in this year’s 2013 event. An event or challenge turns the everyday should of, would of, could of, into Did that.

NaNoWriMo did more than spur on writers. It’s worked for countless creative types like photographers and video buffs, and professionals and amateurs of all abilities. It’s about the kind of transformation that you can make with surprising speed through intense practice. The challenge is an excuse to throw away all your excuses. My list is a mile long. Yours too. Let’s do it anyway.

My two youngest kids have played musical instruments since Kindergarten. They’re approaching their 5th and 6th year of practice respectively. Neither of them have a desire to be a musician. Yet, even without the kind of inner flame it takes to drive great amounts of practice, they can both read and play music proficiently. The kids who practice more, sound better. They stand out. They’ll be the ones getting accepted to middle school after high pressure auditions. And some of those that keep at it will get the same opportunity in high school. And fewer still will realize a dream to attend The Juilliard School.

When we see people get to the top it almost seems like magic.

But we know it’s not.

The people who become great writers, musicians, or entrepreneurs are the ones who Do The Work.

 

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