12 Responses to "Business, more like open source software"
  1. Bob Wilson says:

    Fantastic post Julian!!

    Bob 🙂

  2. jinfinite8 says:

    Thanks Bob. Hey, don\’t you owe Shannon and I a ride in an R.V. or something? 🙂 Give me a ring when you have a a spare moment next week so we can finalize those plans for a South Florida get together. Did you make it to Taluncon? Always a pleasure to hear from you.
    -Cheers

  3. Ben says:

    One of my fav recent reads, Mavericks at Work, has a ton of great examples of how the Open Source concept is being applied in a variety of business situations. As one of the ‘Mavericks’ in the book said (and I’m paraphrasing since I don’t have the book in front of me), Why limit yourself to only those who you can hire in your backyard when you can leverage talent from around the world? The examples provided in this book have incredible implications for the future of work globally.

  4. Julian says:

    Hi Ben, thanks for stopping by. I’m glad you brought up Mavericks at Work because I’ve heard good things about it and a couple months back Shannon picked up a copy. I started reading it about a month ago, got distracted by another great book, and now you’ve given me new inspiration to pick it back up again!

    By the way, the book that interrupted Mavericks at Work is called (let me take a deep breath) An Army of Davids, how markets and technology empower ordinary people to beat big media, big government and other Goliaths by famed blogger and Law Professor Glenn Reynolds. An Army of Davids is a lot about how individuals, afloat in the free market, have created truly ground breaking change in industry, media, politics and science. If you, or other readers of this post haven’t picked this one up yet, I would strongly encourage you to do so. For me, it’s on to Mavericks.

  5. Chris Bailey says:

    Hi Julian, by the sheer joys of the blogosphere I tumbled down the rabbit hole (started here, visited here, finished here) and found your post and site. Your thoughts on open source as an inter-business activity has nudged me a bit closer to piecing together my own puzzle for building intra-business activity. Thinking of our own workplaces and organizational tasks (think: meetings, documentation), they still tend to be overly prescribed and processed affairs. The problem seems to be that organizations strive for the holy grail that’s efficiency which is marked by clean, straight lines. Open source seems to introduce chaos and messiness, two concepts that leave most business execs quaking in their wingtips. I’m still not entirely sure where to go with these ideas, but I’m positively jazzed about some of the experiments I’m thinking about trying out in my own work. No doubt I’ll share them at my own site.

  6. Nathaniel says:

    Hey, great post and a great site. I wanted to drop a line because I too recently read Mavericks and another and another even newer book, Wikinomics, in quick succession. Wikinomics covers a lot of the same issues but goes far more in-depth about the collaborative business model and potential implications and applications. It’s a much more academic read than Mavericks, but great information none the less.

  7. Julian says:

    Hi Nathaniel, great tip on Wikinomics. I’ve been hearing about this book but I’m excited to hear that some of the contents are relevant to our interests in open source. Thanks for stopping by!

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